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Bars

August 20th, 2009

Welcome to the reality page.  This is your place to share and talk about the realities of working on the inside of the toughest beat in America.  Very few of the people know what it is that we do most of the time.  This is easily proven by reading the media coverage prisons recieve.  As far as many people are concerned, we are just a group of goons that go into work everyday, dragging our knuckles along, waiting for the next fight.  We all know that nothing could be farther from the truth, and this is the place to share some of those stories.  The quick, unexpected turns our days can take are the focus here.  Share your stories with me, and together we will learn.

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  1. Jim Evert
    September 22nd, 2009 at 20:14 | #1

    Knowing somebody has your back is as important as wearing a duty belt: without it, you could end up seriously hurt…or worse.
    As a C/O with a couple of years in, I occasionally succumbed to the money-bug: want more, need more! Overtime was the only way to appease the monster, and on this particular day, I was working as the second floor cop in a GP unit at Pelican Bay. My partner for the day, a good friend of mine, was the regular, so we discussed what needed to be done that day. He mentioned he’d like to get in a couple of searches, if I’d be willing to help. He picked out a couple cells that hadn’t been hit in a while, and away we went - two cells on the upper (second) tier. About a 1/2 hour into it, I heard an inmate’s voice hollering out to my partner. I stuck my head out, just to see my partner head downstairs into the dayroom. I quickly followed and glanced up to see the gunner just sticking his mini-14 out of the bars for coverage. The inmate didn’t like it that my partner was searching his cell, and an argument ensued. The inmate wouldn’t back down and started to walk upstairs towards his yet-to-be-finished-searching, cell. My partner grabbed his arm, and we both wound up going to the floor with him. Did I mention this guy was 6′2″, 250 pounds, and a power lifter? Yup, we still had weights on the yard back then. In any case, we struggled for a while and finally got cuffs on him. When I talked to him later, I asked him why he didn’t kick our butts? He said the gunner stopped him. While he was wrestling with us, he looked up and found himself staring at the business-end of a mini-14: that made him quit.

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