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What does it take to work in Corrections.

 

Subscribe to What does it take to work in Corrections. 8 posts, 3 voices

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Correction_officer jamestown0509 313 posts

That’s like the Sgt in state corrections told me. “We can’t beat up inmates anymore when we are assaulted, they want us to talk to them.” He then said, “instead we have the CERT team take them down the stairwell for a private consultation.”

 
Male_user commander 277 posts

Like I said Irish, I didn’t see anything, hear anything or whatever. Some things are better left unknown. LOL

 
Remle-riflepg irish assassin 286 posts

Well our lucasville coward removal tactics are a close trade secret of the line staff. Kinda like the recipe for Bushs’ baked beans or the formula for Coca Cola.

 
Male_user commander 277 posts

The way I looked at what happens in a prison was, It is God’s will. Whatever he decides is what will happen. We don’t have any say so in the matter. So if I respond to a stabbing and get killed, it was meant to happen. At least I died with honor. I guess honor to some people is just a 5 letter word. We too are Civil Servants but we go by an Employee Code of Coduct. If you break a rule and are found guilty, the disciplinary grid is spelled out. OR WR 1 2 5 R. Not always in order like that. Some start at 5 day suspension and go straight to Removal on 2nd offense. The Union will grieve it but, if you have your t’s crossed and i’s dotted, do all the paperwork correctly, it is hard to beat that charge. Most times when it comes to someone being a coward, I really don’t feel the union puts up a big struggle. They are ran by Officers and they don’t like cowards.

 
Correction_officer jamestown0509 313 posts

I wish that management was more reactive to discipline with Officers that are worthless in a backup call or fight. They seem to have the “counseling memo” in mind which is a worthless piece of paper because in New York we are all civil service and it takes an Article 15 to get rid of a CO regardless of circumstances with several civil service hearings by an independent judge. Once in a blue moon management does force COs to resign rather than face an Article 15 hearing. I really got pissed when an officer hid during a fight and refused to help us, so what if you get bumped around, bruised…its your job.

 
Male_user commander 277 posts

Absolutely right. Ture professionals due think alike. The situation you mentioned about the person hiding, the Officers at LUKE would pressure them into resigning. Don’t know what tactics they used or how they accomplished their mission but, they had about a 95% success rate. Didn’t want to know. We dealt with them in the parking lot after work when I was an Officer. Not always physical mostly verbal. Can’t stand a coward. They are more dangerous than the Inmates. I always told the new Officers, you don’t have to be a bad ass, you just have to help. Whether that is holding a leg, arm, whatever, you better be in that pile when I show up or you will face discipline and eventual firing. The Employee Code of Conduct has several rules to use in that circumstance and a few are automatic removal on a first offense. Just come to work, hold your head high and do your job. When needed, be there. Kind of a simple concept. Don’t you think?

 
Correction_officer jamestown0509 313 posts

Absolutely correct. Our Sheriff’s motto is Honesty, Integrity, Professionalism, Compassion. Corrections is a very difficult job regardless if you are working county, state or federal. I think it takes a special person to be a correction officer and be successful at your job for years. Many of those younger COs are ready to get involved in the job which is a good thing but later on I see them rethinking about making corrections a career wanting to be a police officer, State Trooper, Sheriff or go into federal LE. When I saw an officer who was interested in some other career choice I told them go do what makes you happy and leave here. I agree so much with your comments about being fair, firm and consistent and being willing to get into a situation immediately to protect your fellow officers. I have been in fights where an officer (male) hid behind the steel door while two of us were wrestling with an inmate trying to get him pinned to the floor before backup arrived. Its a career that you must be willing and able to accept at face value with all the problems, inmates, staff and supervision.

 
Male_user commander 277 posts

My definition of a true Corrections Professional is quite vast. I believe you have to have honor, integrity, courage and respect. You have to respect authority and be disciplined. There are many times in a person’s career that they will find out what a certain Inmate did to get incarcerated. As hard as you try to not find out. But, you have to treat them all the same. There are many Inmates that just don’t get it. They go out of their way to make your life miserable. You have to have the ability to leave that at work. I call it having a split personality. Be firm, fair, and consistent. You have to willing to run into the fire instead of the natural instinct to run away. You have to be willing to give your life to save a life. You have to be dependable and go to work even if you know it will be a bad day. Imagine driving 35 miles to work after over 700 Inmates have taken over almost half of the prison and have numerous hostages. Not a good feeling. But, you have to go. You would want them to come if you were a hostage. The public doesn’t understand the danger you are in. The experiences you will have, will always be with you. You have to be willing to take a life, to save a life. Even if it means the Inmate you are saving is garbage. It is your job.

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