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Public or Private?

 

Subscribe to Public or Private? 12 posts, 11 voices

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Sgm Sergeant Major 53 posts

Agreed Mudflap. We need a moderator or something to get rid of this spam/spammer…

 
Buckeye flag Mudflap 293 posts

Crap. There is a ton of spam on the boards today and I gotta look, delete… look, delete… look, delete… look, delete… look, delete to get them cleared. And I’ll wager that the poster isn’t even monitoring the posts.

 
Buckeye flag Mudflap 293 posts

I expect the union to back the privates if they pay the same dues we pay. It will be good PR for them to support “saving money” for the state. I also expect the inmates to say “Do you remember when Mudflap worked here? I hear he’s flipping burgers now.”

 
Ligtning C/O 5 posts

This law that has been put forth in Ohio is not going to be pretty. The officals want it so they can save $$$$, and the public wants it so it will reduce spending and open private sector jobs.

For over twenty years that I have been in ODRC we have heard rumor after rumor about privitization now the threat looks real.

AFSME/OCSEA has backed the Dems for years, lets see if the Dems will back us now that we need them.

 
Flag shakey 191 posts

Ohio just put in front on the Ohio General Assembly on May 25, 2010. SB 269. Which requires a committee to see if it can save the State money to privatize DR&C and to come up with a plan to turn over at least half of Ohios prisons by Dec.31. 2011.

 
Lion Comfortably ... 154 posts

We recently had a private prison in Ohio where the Officers successfully went union. Any other private facilities have any success in this?

 
Male user Jiggerout 2278 3 posts

I have worked for the BOP and for the GEO Group. There are good and bad about both. Privates are forced to manage their budgets effectively, but are quicker to deal with equipment shortages and staff issues than public prisons. I have never seen a situation where a program or inmate need was dropped based soley on a budget issue.

 
Male user prisoncop 3 posts

i currently work for the BOP but i worked for CCA which is the largest private corrections company out there and i learned alot in the 11 some odd yrs i worked for them they do have some issues as far as no union and the way they can fire you for the least mistake but as far as training goes it is comparable to that of the BOP there was some defensive tactic training and such i have never had a use force that was questioned or second quessed while i was at CCA so they do back you up on that from Sgts on up do carry OC also and they would use it if need be and as far as the benefits i wasnt paying a dime for my health insurrance and my family was included and i see no different in it then what i have now i took a pay cut to come to the BOP so they do pay pretty good if here is the kicker you have the right contract we had USMS,ICE,and BOP inmates so thats why the pay was so good i learned alot at my time at CCA and was able to work with a variety of inmates from all over the world i see alot of things that are the same at CCA and BOP because the founder is an ex BOP director and most of their policy makers are ex BOP so the bottom line they should get just as much respect as those of us that are in public agencies because they are our brothers and sisters behind the line im through ranting thanks

 
Male user CDCRJim 5 posts

With the crime rate on the rise, the thousands of people sneaking across the border everyday, and so many companies leaving the country to get cheap labor, corrections may be the most available and prosperous job in the near future other than Wal-Mart. Private prisons seem to set up shop in remote areas that don’t have much else to offer, in terms of employment. Unfortunately, private prisons pay poorly compared to most government prison systems, I don’t think they have any labor union protection, I don’t think they have very good retirement and medical benefits. I have heard the training is next to nothing and like the BOP, the officers do not carry or train with chemical agents, batons, and other useful tools to protect staff and control inmates. It’s dangerous work and I would not do it for low pay and poor benefits. My hats off to those that can deal with so much for so little.

 
Male user bhkidd 7 posts

I currently work for a public agency, but did some time at a CCA facility. I found that the private companies perform well in certain areas, such as cost management and inmate programs. However, I found that the private companies often pay less that public agencies, and they have major problems with staff retention and quality. Also, the companies are not real big on defensive tactics training, and really are squeamish about justified UOF. The companies will fire you just to save face. Remember that most larger public agencies have some form of civil service protection, while you are employed at will with a company. Just my two cents worth.

 
Female user weareone 1 post

I have ample experience working for two public correctional facilities, but have not worked for a private one. In my opinion, the entire sheriff’s system in the state of Massachusetts needs an overhaul. If you want a job where you can put your feet up on a desk and read the newspaper rather than tend to the needs of the inmates you serve, a public agency is the place for you. On the other hand, if you care-and want to make a difference-ask a lot of questions and think twice before you sign on to work. Good luck with the job hunting!

 
Avatar2 4 Crosstimbers... 3 posts

Does anyone here have experience working for both a public agency and a private agency? If so, how do you compare the two?

Anyone with CCA experience?

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